Be careful and keep your car in good technical condition

Dodane: 29-08-2016 14:39
Be careful and keep your car in good technical condition best oil for Bentley

Reciprocating

Classification

There are several possible ways to classify internal combustion engines.

Reciprocating:

By number of strokes

Two-stroke engine

Clerk Cycle 1879 6
Day Cycle

Four-stroke engine (Otto cycle)
Six-stroke engine

By type of ignition

Compression-ignition engine
Spark-ignition engine (commonly found as gasoline engines)

By mechanical/thermodynamical cycle (these 2 cycles do not encompass all reciprocating engines, and are infrequently used):

Atkinson cycle
Miller cycle

Rotary:

Wankel engine

Continuous combustion:

Gas turbine
Jet engine

Rocket engine
Ramjet

The following jet engine types are also gas turbines types:

Turbojet
Turbofan
Turboprop



Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internal_combustion_engine


Car - etymology

The word "car" is believed to originate from the Latin word carrus or carrum ("wheeled vehicle"), or the Middle English word carre (meaning cart, from Old North French). In turn, these originated from the Gaulish word karros (a Gallic chariot). The Gaulish language was a branch of the Brythoic language which also used the word Karr; the Brythonig language evolved into Welsh (and Gaelic) where 'Car llusg' (a drag cart or sledge) and 'car rhyfel' (war chariot) still survive.1112 It originally referred to any wheeled horse-drawn vehicle, such as a cart, carriage, or wagon.1314 "Motor car" is attested from 1895, and is the usual formal name for cars in British English.3 "Autocar" is a variant that is also attested from 1895, but that is now considered archaic. It literally means "self-propelled car".15 The term "horseless carriage" was used by some to refer to the first cars at the time that they were being built, and is attested from 1895.16

The word "automobile" is a classical compound derived from the Ancient Greek word autós (?????), meaning "self", and the Latin word mobilis, meaning "movable". It entered the English language from French, and was first adopted by the Automobile Club of Great Britain in 1897.17 Over time, the word "automobile" fell out of favour in Britain, and was replaced by "motor car". It remains a chiefly North American usage.18 An abbreviated form, "auto", was formerly a common way to refer to cars in English, but is now considered old-fashioned. The word is still used in some compound formations in American English, like "auto industry" and "auto mechanic".

Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Car#Etymology


Public costs - car issue

The external costs of automobiles, as similarly other economic externalities, are the measurable costs for other parties except the car proprietor, such costs not being taken into account when the proprietor opts to drive their car. According to the Harvard University,11 the main externalities of driving are local and global pollution, oil dependence, traffic congestion and traffic accidents; while according to a meta-study conducted by the Delft University12 these externalities are congestion and scarcity costs, accident costs, air pollution costs, noise costs, climate change costs, costs for nature and landscape, costs for water pollution, costs for soil pollution and costs of energy dependency. The existence of the car allows on-demand travel, given, that the necessary infrastructure is in place. This infrastructure represents a monetary cost, but also cost in terms of common assets that are difficult to represent monetarily, such as land use and air pollution.



Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economics_of_car_use